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for your information

Tickets sold online are in limited quantities.

In the event that online tickets are unavailable, tickets will still be on sale directly at the Eiffel Tower’s ticket offices

All visitors must be physically present to purchase their tickets at the ground floor and on the 2nd floor.

Thank you for coming at the visitation hour that you’ve selected

If you are later than 30 minutes, access to the tower may be denied.


* In accordance with article L.121.20.4 of the Consumer's Code, tickets are not eligible for a refund. The purchase of a ticket is final and may not be retracted by the customer

 

To access the Eiffel Tower, you must present your electronic ticket (not just your reservation number, which will not be accepted):

Either printed legibly onto A4 paper

Including your name, first name, and information related to the chosen product, in particular the barcode and its number.

Or by displaying the barcode on your mobile phone.

Careful, some smartphones are not suited to this task

The Group will print their tickets onto A4 paper, or collect them at the Group desk.

 

preparing your visit

Find all of the information you need to visit the Eiffel Tower and discover the most beautiful view over Paris – as a family, alone, or as a group.

On the spot

Restaurants

DISCOVER THE RESTAURANTS OF THE EIFFEL TOWER AND EXPERIENCE AN UNFORGETTABLE MOMENT

The Eiffel Tower has the most breathtaking tables of Paris to offer its visitors: where a feast for your taste buds is accompanied by a feast for the eyes. With its various restaurants, the Tower has a complete range of eats to offer, from a simple snack to the finest French cuisine.

On the spot

Champagne bar

For something different and unique, take a moment to enjoy the champagne bar, which is located at the top of the Eiffel Tower

Nestled right into the structure of the Tower, the bar offers a choice of a glass of either rosé or white champagne, served as chilled as you like. It’s an elegant and festive way to toast a sensational experience at the top of the Tower. The bar is open daily from noon to 5:15 pm and from 6:15 pm to 10:45 pm.

for your information

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Their history

Gourmet rendezvous on the first floor

For the Universal Exhibition of 1889, four majestic wooden pavilions designed by Stephen Sauvestre decked the platform on the first floor. Each restaurant could seat 500 people. The kitchens were attached to the underside of the platform and, until 1900, the restaurants relied on gas lights.

 
resto-histoire-01

 - Trocadéro side : A bar dubbed the “Flamand” (the Flemish) instead served Alsatian cuisine, and the waitresses wore regional clothing. It was then transformed into a very popular theater. During the Exhibition of 1900, however, it did become a short-lived restaurant again, and described as Dutch this time. The theatre resumed its activities up until war broke out in 1914.   

- Between the Eastern and Northern pillars : A typical Russian restaurant welcomed visitors.

- Champ-de-Mars side : Visitors were offered French fare at Brébant, which was for a long time considered a chic restaurant.

 

These four establishments were demolished for the International Exhibition of 1937, which led to a complete overhaul of the Tower's first floor. Only two restaurants were then rebuilt, one where the Russian restaurant had been, and the other where the Dutch one had. The architect Auguste Granet, who was married to the granddaughter of Gustave Eiffel, headed the 1930s-style construction.

 

In the early 1980s, these restaurants were replaced when the Tower underwent major renovations. The brand-new "La Belle France" and "Le Parisien" became the two not-to-be-missed gourmet restaurants on the Eiffel Tower. In 1996, “La Belle France” and “Le Parisien” were transformed into one huge brasserie. Decorated by Slavik and Loup, with a hot air balloon inspired theme, its structure emphasized the view of Paris. It was named the “Altitude 95,” a winking reference to aerial navigation, owing to its location 95 metres above sea level.

 

After a complete refurbishment at the end of 2008, the establishment was reopened to the public in early 2009: the “58 TOUR EIFFEL” welcomed its first customers. During the day, it’s picnic chic in the Parisian sky! And in the evening, a one on one romantic dinner with the City of Light. Refined dishes, an intimate atmosphere, an outstanding decor and a warm welcome: all the ingredients you need for a restaurant that lives up to your every expectation!

 

 

 

Their history

Gourmet cuisine 125 metres above the capital

 

 

resto-histoire-08By 1983, the construction of the Jules Verne restaurant on the second floor was finished, an homage to the famous novelist and spokesperson for literary, scientific, and industrial progress. Chef Alain Reix oversaw the kitchens, and customers enjoyed privileged access via the South pillar elevator, reserved exclusively for use by the restaurant.

 

 On December 22nd, 2007, following four months of renovations – the Jules Verne was redesigned by Patrick Jouin – the restaurant reopened its doors to the public, with the renowned chef Alain Ducasse at its culinary helm. The chef’s only one wish: for the Jules Verne to be “the most beautiful place in Paris to savour the pleasures of accessible, contemporary French cuisine.”